College Forum Vol 14 Num 4 : Page 2

ALUMNInews WHIMSICAL WISDOM World-renowned economist’s career path began at MDC The New York Times recently called MDC grad-uate Carmen Reinhart “the most influential fe-male economist in the world.” Helping generate buzz around the globe is her new book, This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly, which she co-wrote with Ken-neth Rogoff. Centuries of documentation Reinhart and Rogoff pored over thousands of documents to produce a book that studies the similarities of the recurring booms and busts that have characterized economics around the world for generations. Born Carmen Castellanos, Reinhart lived in Cu-ba until she was 10 years old. Her father, an ac-countant, moved the family to the United States, where he became a carpenter and his wife a seamstress. Change of heart Reinhart went to MDC to study fashion mer-chandising. Out of the blue, she decided to take an economics course and got hooked. After finishing at MDC, she continued studying economics, eventually earning a Ph.D. at Colum-bia University and becoming the chief economist at Bear Stearns investment bank. Reinhart is now a professor of economics and director of the Center for International Econom-ics at the University of Maryland. She and Rogoff began writing their book in 2003. After it was Capturing a Tony – again Film, TV and stage, Katie Finneran has done it all, and done it exceedingly well. So it came as no surprise to anyone – especially at New World School of the Arts (NWSA) at MDC, her initial training arena – when she recently took home her second Tony Award. Finneran was named Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her role in the first revival of Prom-ises, Promises, with music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. The musical, adapted from a book by Neil Simon, is based on Billy Wilder’s 1960 film The Apartment. Although Finneran appears in only two scenes of the mu-sical, she makes good use of that scant stage time, winning over the audience and stealing the show. After graduating from NWSA, the Chicago na-tive who was raised in Miami headed to Carne-gie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. But Broadway beckoned, and barely a year later, at age 19, she moved to New York City. Two decades later, Finneran has a slew of film, theater and TV roles on her résumé, including the lead in George Romero’s remake of Night of the Living Dead, along with TV roles in Sex and the City, Frasier and Oz. With such a wide-ranging career, her most highly lauded work has happened on stage, where she has played everything from Sally Bowles in the Tony-award winning revival of Cab-aret to a supporting role opposite Kevin Spacey in Eugene O'Neill's classic The Iceman Cometh. But it was her performance as Brooke Ashton in Noises Off that would win her both the Tony and Drama Desk Award for Best Featured Ac-tress in 2002. Now, much to everyone's delight here at MDC, she's captured a second Tony. “Whenever an actor triumphs, it is a victory for all of us who love theater,” said Jeffrey Hodgson, Katie Finneran NWSA’s interim provost. “But when it is one of our own graduates, who spent their formative years at our institution, our joy and pride are jus-tifiably boundless.” – HP MDC was banker’s golden opportunity COLLEGE Dade College us and 2010 Fame hon-srael Velasco had a clear of his road cess. eady as a Israel Velasco g man, Velas-as interested nance and k ing wi th ple, so he w that bank-would be a ural fit. He rted his ca-reer early, work-ing as a teller at a local bank, which in turn led to a variety of retail banking positions, including one that would prove crucial – his job as a com-2 COLLEGEforum mercial lender. By age 37, he became one of the youngest high-ranking bank executives in the region when he was appointed as president and CEO of Co-lonial Bank’s $3-billion, 45-branch South Florida operations. As region executive of Banco Popular North America, Velasco currently oversees the retail and commercial banking of its 20 branches in Central and South Florida, as well as its suc-cessful Popular Association Banking Unit, which serves community associations in 19 states. Velasco credits his success as a banker to his “clear focus, determination, consistency and a solid education.” “Miami Dade College gave me a great oppor-tunity that I wasn’t going to get anywhere else,” Velasco said recently. “It gave me the jump-start I needed to continue my education and pursue my career.” – HP MIAMI DADE COLLEGEforum Communications Director Marketing and Publications Director Editorial Director Copy Editors/Contributors Graphic Designers Contributors Staff Photographers Production Coordinator September 2010 • Volume 14 • Number 4 Carmen Reinhart published in 2009, New York Times columnist David Brooks praised it as the “best explanation of the [financial] crisis.” And it all started from one class she took on a whim at MDC. — WV Published by Miami Dade College, Office of Communications 300 N.E. Second Ave., Miami, FL 33132-2296 Send e-mails to editor@mdc.edu. Juan C Mendieta Irene Giménez Muñoz Brenda Krebs Jonathan Dubin, Hector Pino Pasita Andino, Carmen Bosch, Ricardo Delgado, Grizelle Paz-Harrison, Shari Robbins, Arturo Valdes Barbara Bickel, Nicholas Garnett, Natalia Maldonado, Pilar Ulibarri de Rivera, Walter Villa Carlos Llano, Phil Roche Susan Smitherman For more information about MDC programs, call 305-237-8888 or visit www.mdc.edu.

Whimsical Wisdom

<b>World-renowned economist's career path began at MDC</b><br /> <br /> <br /> The New York Times recently called MDC graduate Carmen Reinhart “the most influential female economist in the world.”<br /> <br /> Helping generate buzz around the globe is her new book, This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly, which she co-wrote with Kenneth Rogoff.<br /> <br /> <b>Centuries of documentation</b><br /> <br /> Reinhart and Rogoff pored over thousands of documents to produce a book that studies the similarities of the recurring booms and busts that have characterized economics around the world for generations.<br /> <br /> Born Carmen Castellanos, Reinhart lived in Cuba until she was 10 years old. Her father, an accountant, moved the family to the United States, where he became a carpenter and his wife a seamstress.<br /> <br /> <b>Change of heart</b><br /> <br /> Reinhart went to MDC to study fashion merchandising. Out of the blue, she decided to take an economics course and got hooked.<br /> <br /> After finishing at MDC, she continued studying economics, eventually earning a Ph.D. at Columbia University and becoming the chief economist at Bear Stearns investment bank.<br /> <br /> Reinhart is now a professor of economics and director of the Center for International Economics at the University of Maryland. She and Rogoff began writing their book in 2003. After it was published in 2009, New York Times columnist David Brooks praised it as the “best explanation of the [financial] crisis.”<br /> <br /> And it all started from one class she took on a whim at MDC.<br /> <br /> — WV

Capturing a Tony - again

Film, TV and stage, Katie Finneran has done it all, and done it exceedingly well. So it came as no surprise to anyone – especially at New World School of the Arts (NWSA) at MDC, her initial training arena – when she recently took home her second Tony Award.<br /> <br /> Finneran was named Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her role in the first revival of Promises, Promises, with music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. The musical, adapted from a book by Neil Simon, is based on Billy Wilder’s 1960 film The Apartment. Although Finneran appears in only two scenes of the musical, she makes good use of that scant stage time, winning over the audience and stealing the show.<br /> <br /> After graduating from NWSA, the Chicago native who was raised in Miami headed to Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. But Broadway beckoned, and barely a year later, at age 19, she moved to New York City.<br /> <br /> Two decades later, Finneran has a slew of film, theater and TV roles on her résumé, including the lead in George Romero’s remake of Night of the Living Dead, along with TV roles in Sex and the City, Frasier and Oz.<br /> <br /> With such a wide-ranging career, her most highly lauded work has happened on stage, where she has played everything from Sally Bowles in the Tony-award winning revival of Cabaret to a supporting role opposite Kevin Spacey in Eugene O'Neill's classic The Iceman Cometh.<br /> <br /> But it was her performance as Brooke Ashton in Noises Off that would win her both the Tony and Drama Desk Award for Best Featured Actress in 2002.<br /> <br /> Now, much to everyone's delight here at MDC, she's captured a second Tony.<br /> <br /> “Whenever an actor triumphs, it is a victory for all of us who love theater,” said Jeffrey Hodgson, NWSA’s interim provost. “But when it is one of our own graduates, who spent their formative years at our institution, our joy and pride are justifiably boundless.”<br /> <br /> – HP

MDC was banker's golden opportunity

Miami Dade College alumnus and 2010 Hall of Fame honoree Israel Velasco always had a clear vision of his road to success.<br /> <br /> Already as a young man, Velasco was interested in finance and working with people, so he knew that banking would be a natural fit. He started his career early, working as a teller at a local bank, which in turn led to a variety of retail banking positions, including one that would prove crucial – his job as a commercial Lender.<br /> <br /> By age 37, he became one of the youngest high-ranking bank executives in the region when he was appointed as president and CEO of Colonial Bank’s $3-billion, 45-branch South Florida operations.<br /> <br /> As region executive of Banco Popular North America, Velasco currently oversees the retail and commercial banking of its 20 branches in Central and South Florida, as well as its successful Popular Association Banking Unit, which serves community associations in 19 states.<br /> <br /> Velasco credits his success as a banker to his “clear focus, determination, consistency and a solid education.” <br /> <br /> “Miami Dade College gave me a great opportunity that I wasn’t going to get anywhere else,” Velasco said recently. “It gave me the jump-start I needed to continue my education and pursue my career.”<br /> <br /> – HP

Alumni News

<b>WHIMSICAL WISDOM</b><br /> World-renowned economist's career path began at MDC<br /> <br /> The New York Times recently called MDC graduate Carmen Reinhart “the most influential female economist in the world.”<br /> <br /> Helping generate buzz around the globe is her new book, This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly, which she co-wrote with Kenneth Rogoff.<br /> <br /> <b>Centuries of documentation</b><br /> <br /> Reinhart and Rogoff pored over thousands of documents to produce a book that studies the similarities of the recurring booms and busts that have characterized economics around the world for generations.<br /> <br /> Born Carmen Castellanos, Reinhart lived in Cuba until she was 10 years old. Her father, an accountant, moved the family to the United States, where he became a carpenter and his wife a seamstress.<br /> <br /> <b>Change of heart</b><br /> <br /> Reinhart went to MDC to study fashion merchandising. Out of the blue, she decided to take an economics course and got hooked.<br /> <br /> After finishing at MDC, she continued studying economics, eventually earning a Ph.D. at Columbia University and becoming the chief economist at Bear Stearns investment bank.<br /> <br /> Reinhart is now a professor of economics and director of the Center for International Economics at the University of Maryland. She and Rogoff began writing their book in 2003. After it was published in 2009, New York Times columnist David Brooks praised it as the “best explanation of the [financial] crisis.”<br /> <br /> And it all started from one class she took on a whim at MDC.<br /> <br /> — WV <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <b>Capturing a Tony - again</b><br /> <br /> Film, TV and stage, Katie Finneran has done it all, and done it exceedingly well. So it came as no surprise to anyone – especially at New World School of the Arts (NWSA) at MDC, her initial training arena – when she recently took home her second Tony Award.<br /> <br /> Finneran was named Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her role in the first revival of Promises, Promises, with music and lyrics by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. The musical, adapted from a book by Neil Simon, is based on Billy Wilder’s 1960 film The Apartment. Although Finneran appears in only two scenes of the musical, she makes good use of that scant stage time, winning over the audience and stealing the show.<br /> <br /> After graduating from NWSA, the Chicago native who was raised in Miami headed to Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. But Broadway beckoned, and barely a year later, at age 19, she moved to New York City.<br /> <br /> Two decades later, Finneran has a slew of film, theater and TV roles on her résumé, including the lead in George Romero’s remake of Night of the Living Dead, along with TV roles in Sex and the City, Frasier and Oz.<br /> <br /> With such a wide-ranging career, her most highly lauded work has happened on stage, where she has played everything from Sally Bowles in the Tony-award winning revival of Cabaret to a supporting role opposite Kevin Spacey in Eugene O'Neill's classic The Iceman Cometh.<br /> <br /> But it was her performance as Brooke Ashton in Noises Off that would win her both the Tony and Drama Desk Award for Best Featured Actress in 2002.<br /> <br /> Now, much to everyone's delight here at MDC, she's captured a second Tony.<br /> <br /> “Whenever an actor triumphs, it is a victory for all of us who love theater,” said Jeffrey Hodgson, NWSA’s interim provost. “But when it is one of our own graduates, who spent their formative years at our institution, our joy and pride are justifiably boundless.”<br /> <br /> – HP<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <b>MDC was banker's golden opportunity</b><br /> <br /> Miami Dade College alumnus and 2010 Hall of Fame honoree Israel Velasco always had a clear vision of his road to success.<br /> <br /> Already as a young man, Velasco was interested in finance and working with people, so he knew that banking would be a natural fit. He started his career early, working as a teller at a local bank, which in turn led to a variety of retail banking positions, including one that would prove crucial – his job as a commercial Lender.<br /> <br /> By age 37, he became one of the youngest high-ranking bank executives in the region when he was appointed as president and CEO of Colonial Bank’s $3-billion, 45-branch South Florida operations.<br /> <br /> As region executive of Banco Popular North America, Velasco currently oversees the retail and commercial banking of its 20 branches in Central and South Florida, as well as its successful Popular Association Banking Unit, which serves community associations in 19 states.<br /> <br /> Velasco credits his success as a banker to his “clear focus, determination, consistency and a solid education.” <br /> <br /> “Miami Dade College gave me a great opportunity that I wasn’t going to get anywhere else,” Velasco said recently. “It gave me the jump-start I needed to continue my education and pursue my career.”<br /> <br /> – HP

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading