TR Footnotes January 2014 : Page 1

TOWING & RECOVERY The Independent Voice of the Towing Industry January 2014 FOOTN TES Air to ® w y o no hl nt inf 4 mo o Page 2 p e re Se Keeping Industry Pros On Their Tows www.trfootnotes.com When It’s tIme to… • Buy or sell that truck • FInd the gear you need • hIre a driver or dispatcher • Land a towing job The All Coast team The industry’s popular classified section for trucks, equipment, jobs, and services advertIse in tow truck trader! CaLL heidi at 866-880-3666 In the towIng SPotLIght In This Issue: Financial February: Parts & Accessories An F-105 Thun-derchief that All Coast Aircraft Recovery recently relocated from Kelly AFB in San Antonio, TX, to the Palm Springs Air Museum Ground By AllAn T. Duffin A retired airman transports wrecked & restored planes “i and all of my team members thor-oughly enjoy our line of work, as well as the people we meet and work with,” he said. Often an aircraft needs to be taken apart before it can be loaded and driven to its destination. All Coast accomplishes most of its aircraft hauling by placing the components on pickup trucks. the company also has a special trailer, load-ed with the unique tools and equipment required to disassemble larger aircraft. VOlume 24, NumBer 8 x $3.95 x ©2014 CAusey eNterPrises, llC. x All rights reserVed. C huck “Chuckmo” mosely isn’t a tower in the traditional sense. he doesn’t tow cars, trucks, vans, or station wagons. mosely’s company just tows airplanes. All Coast Aircraft recov-ery, inc. (www.allcoastaircraftrecovery. com), based in Weirsdale, Florida, works with three types of clients: insurance companies that need damaged aircraft transported to repair facilities, private owners who want their property moved from point to point, and museums that need to relocate historic aircraft. All Coast has been performing air-craft recovery and transport for 15 years and mosely isn’t stopping anytime soon. Heavy Hauling the size of the aircraft is a determin-ing factor when planning a transport see AIr To Ground, page 3 P .O. Box 64397 Virginia Beach, VA 23467 Towing & Recovery Footnotes ® Prst std u.s. POstAge PAid peoria, il permit no. 315

AIR TO GROUND

AllAn T. Duffin


Huck “Chuckmo” mosely isn’t a tower in the traditional sense. he doesn’t tow cars, trucks, vans, or station wagons. mosely’s company just tows airplanes. All Coast Aircraft recovery, inc. (www.allcoastaircraftrecovery. com), based in Weirsdale, Florida, works with three types of clients: insurance companies that need damaged aircraft transported to repair facilities, private owners who want their property moved from point to point, and museums that need to relocate historic aircraft.

All Coast has been performing aircraft recovery and transport for 15 years and mosely isn’t stopping anytime soon. “i and all of my team members thoroughly enjoy our line of work, as well as the people we meet and work with,” he said.

Often an aircraft needs to be taken apart before it can be loaded and driven to its destination. All Coast accomplishes most of its aircraft hauling by placing the components on pickup trucks. the company also has a special trailer, loaded with the unique tools and equipment required to disassemble larger aircraft.

Heavy Hauling

the size of the aircraft is a determining factor when planning a transport operation. “large aircraft require large trucks, even when they are disassembled,” mosely said. “in most cases we need multiple trucks to relocate a single aircraft.”

heavy-hauling capability for All Coast is provided by two vendors: les Chapman transport, inc., out of Blossom, texas, and skipper shippers, inc., out of Jenson Beach, Florida. “We have a very close and mutually supportive working relationship with both of these companies,” explained mosely. “these two companies also arrange and manage all of the permit and escort requirements.”

What if the job requires a crane? mosely again contracts with local providers. “Our crane requirements vary depending on the size and weight of the aircraft and any disassembled aircraft components,” he explained.

All Coast also has a standard contract with united rentals for jobs that require forklifts or man-lifts. united rentals delivers and picks up the rental equipment at the job site.

Air Manpower

depending on the type and size of the aircraft, mosely gathers between three and 10 personnel for a recovery job. “i have a group of men who have worked with me since the formation of the company,” said mosely.

each man on mosely’s staff is more than just familiar with how to load and tow an aircraft — all are well qualified on the operation of aircraft as well. mosely’s team members are all aviation maintenance specialists who hold an FAA airframe and powerplant (A&P) license. most of the team members hold private pilots’ licenses, and half of them are FAA-certified to perform certain inspections on the aircraft.

“All of my team members have a lot of experience staging, loading, securing, and unloading the various aircraft for surface transportation,” said mosely. “A lot of [that experience] is gained through moving the same type of aircraft on multiple occasions.” during a recovery job, mosely also assigns each of his staffers a collateral duty such as safety, hAZmAt, and rigging supervision.

Insurance Transport

As noted, All Coast hauls busted aircraft for insurance companies, but fortunately these particular gigs aren’t usually too complicated. “All of our aircraft relocation projects are planned well in advance,” he explained, “and do not usually involve aircraft that have suffered extensive damage.”

A few years ago, mosely and his staff received a call from an insurance company with a simple request: “Please relocate a privately owned Cessna Citation mustang (a small business aircraft) from an airport in northern san diego county.”

While the aircraft was landing, it jumped the runway and came back down at an awkward angle. the main landing gear, flaps, and main wing assembly were damaged. “the mishap damage was of such extent,” recalled mosely, “that it rendered the aircraft as non-flyable until the damage was repaired.”

the insurance company needed All Coast to disassemble, load, and transport the crippled aircraft to the Cessna repair and service Center in sacramento, California, a distance of approximately 500 miles.

Team Effort

“my company pre-fabricated a fuselage transportation fixture — a cradle for the airplane to rest in — from drawings provided by Cessna,” said mosely. “this became a joint operation. Our team worked closely with representatives from the Cessna repair and service Center in order to transport the aircraft in a safe and protected manner.” mosely needed to make sure that no additional damage occurred to the airplane during transport.

After mosely and his staff removed the wing assembly, they wrapped a harness around the fuselage and moved it gently onto the cradle, which had been mounted on a trailer. the wing assembly was lifted onto its own trailer, and both trucks then departed for sacramento, where the procedure was reversed and the aircraft sections were unloaded so that Cessna could repair them.

“this is very typical of these type of aircraft relocation projects,” said mosely. “the joint team efforts are always very enjoyable operations.”V

to view photos of aircraft recovery work by all Coast aircraft recovery, inc., go to www.allcoastaircraftrecovery.com/photo_albums

Veteran Airman

it’s no surprise that Chuck mosely works in an aviation-related field. His father flew Grumman F6F Hellcats during World War ii. When mosely was old enough, he enlisted in the U.S. navy, launching a military career that lasted 35 years. “i started out as an aviation structural mechanic for my first 14 years,” he recalled. “i also flew as an air crewman on Sp-5B martin marlin sea patrol planes and Dp-2e lockheed neptune target launch aircraft.”

During the Vietnam War, mosely was assigned to VF- 114, a squadron that flew the F-4 phantom fighter, aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Kitty Hawk. Five years later he earned an officer’s commission and supervised maintenance for various aircraft until his retirement from the navy in 1998.

While he was an aircraft maintenance officer, mosely worked closely with the navy museum in pensacola, Fl. the museum temporarily loaned its retired military aircraft to other museums around the country.

after he retired, mosely wanted to continue helping museums find and relocate airplanes for static display. He founded all Coast aircraft recovery to do just that. along the way he expanded his company’s offerings into private-property and insurance work.

Museum Moves

mosely’s favorite type of relocation project is the transport of historic aircraft for museums around the country. it’s important, he said, “to preserve our nation’s rich aviation heritage.”

one of his company’s projects involved the transport of a World War ii B-17 four-engine bomber from the Smithsonian institution in Washington, D.C., to the mighty 8th air Force museum in pooler, Georgia.

“What was so unique about this aircraft relocation,” mosely recalled, “was the requirement to place the aircraft into the museum building a piece at a time, in the proper sequence, to facilitate the reassembly in a restricted space.”

Sounds simple enough. However, mosely and his team had to roll the sections of the B-17 through a tunnel that was just 10 feet high and 14 feet wide, then reassemble the aircraft inside the museum.

on another occasion mosely and his team transported and reassembled a B-25 medium bomber and a B-17 inside the newly constructed display building at the national WWii museum in new orleans.

after that, Crownpoint, inc., of Sun Valley, California, hoisted the two aircraft on wires so that the B-25 and B-17 hung from the ceiling.

“What made this task unique,” said mosely, “was that we had to move both aircraft into the building through another small opening, one piece at a time. after that we reassembled both aircraft and Crownpoint hoisted them 35 feet into the air, into their display positions.”

the component parts of the B-25 and B-17 were delivered to the museum on flatbed trailers — standard rollbacks — and also by forklift. all of the individual components were on mobile dolly fixtures so they could be relocated on the display floor after they were unloaded.

another challenge during this relocation job: the building was still under construction and mosely’s team had to work around 300 other people. “there were workers and craftsmen of various professions all around us — drywall installers, air conditioning technicians, electricians.”

How it’s done

• to lift the aircraft components, mosely and his team use nylon harnesses of various lengths and strength ratings. “the harnesses are usually used in pairs,” explained mosely, “and are used as part of the individual rigging solutions along with the appropriate steel shackles and couplings.” mosely also uses steel cables when using a spreader bar for major lifts.

• “major lifts” usually involve the aircraft fuselage, which usually requires a crane that’s subcontracted from a local company. the cranes are normally in the 20,000- to 80,000-pound range, depending on the type of aircraft being relocated.

• Heaviest aircraft relocated: 75,800 pounds (empty). this was the C-130 Hercules cargo transport. “of course, the various components after disassembly weigh less,” said mosely, “but the fuselage is still over 30,000 pounds.”

• lightest aircraft relocated: 1,500 pounds.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/AIR+TO+GROUND/1595049/190000/article.html.

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