The Monthly November 2011 : Page 4

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Be East Bay BeEB KUDOS Golden Gate girls. After a half-century of hard, often hands-on work, Save the Bay is ready to party. On Thursday, Nov. 3, the powerful grassroots organization hosts the gala Splash! 50 Years of Making Waves, at the Metreon (101 Fourth St., San Fran-cisco), featuring fine regional foods and wines, live and silent auctions, entertain-ment by Lavay Smith and the Red Hot Skillet Lickers, and, okay, a $250 admis-sion fee (that benefits one of the best environ-mental causes around). Founded in 1961 by East Bay residents Kay Kerr, Sylvia McLaughlin, and Esther Gulick, the volunteer-intensive group scored an initial coup by halting the city of Berkeley’s plan to expand by filling the Bay waters just offshore. Five decades later, Save the Bay continues to challenge bayfill and shoreline development, reduce runoff pollution, restore wetlands, and do its bit to promote gracious California living. For gala tickets and info: (510) 463-6850 or savesfbay.org. KUDOS ○○○○ ○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○ READ READ The September Queen, Gillian Bagwell’s second sexy novel set in olde England, is hot off the press (Berkley Publishing Group, to be precise) this month. The book centers around the true story of the passionate and adventurous Jane Lane, a 17th-century En-glish woman who risked her life to rescue King Charles II from peril. Berkeley-born and -bred, author Bagwell is a former actress and life-long Anglophile who studied drama in London and founded the Pasadena Shakespeare Company, which she headed for nine years. Bagwell hosts a release party for The September Queen on Tuesday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m., at Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant Ave. For info: (510) 647-8784 or gillianbagwell.com. ○○○○ ○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○ GO Over at the Oakland Asian Cultural Center (388 Ninth St.), Yone Noguchi in Cali-GO The nature of Noguchi. fornia: A Japanese Poet Among Oakland’s Famous Writers runs through Jan. 31. The exhibit features not only Noguchi’s work, but also that of the writers who influenced him— among them Bay Area authors Joaquin Miller and John Muir. On Sunday, Nov. 6 (1-3 p.m.), the center offers “Bringing the Outside In,” a free presentation on Japanese flower-arrang-ing and writing haiku, in keeping with Noguchi’s keen observations on nature. Same place, different time: a free, Noguchi-inspired collabo-rative dance and poetry performance, “Kneel to You Like a Sigh,” on Sunday, Nov. 13, at 2 p.m. For info: (510) 637-0455 or oacc.cc. If you find yourself in Terminal 3 at San Francisco International Airport near Gate 76, check out the Benjamen Chinn: Paris 1950– 1951 photography show on display through the end of this month. Part of SFO Museum’s rotating exhibit program, Chinn’s black-and-white photos portray daily Parisian life, including families, musicians, and workers. Born on Commercial Street in San Francisco’s Chinatown district in 1921, Chinn’s photography interest began when he was 10, when he learned to develop and print photographs in the family basement. For info: (650) 821-6700 or flysfo.com. Homegrown, happy-go-lucky, and, in the words of band member Dan Ringer-Barwick, “completely unknown,” the rootsy, acoustic band Fools Creekplays Freight & Salvage (2020 Addison St., Berkeley) on Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 8 p.m. Composed entirely of working continues GO Work by more than 100 artists will be for sale Nov. 3-6 at 50 percent off at KALASSAL, A Colossal Art Sale/Fundraiser to benefit Kala Art Institute, a Zaentz’s moviemaker mecca. nonprofit arts organization that offers studio residencies, gallery exhibitions, and public educational programs. The free event kicks off Thursday, Nov. 3, 6-9 p.m, at the Kala Gallery, 2990 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley. Come swing to the music of 5 Cent Coffee, a post-modern jug band from Vallejo, and sample fare from the Guerrilla Grub food truck. The sale continues Nov. 4-5, 12-5:30 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 6, 12-4:30 p.m. For info: (510) 841-7000 or kala.org/kalassal. Here’s looking at you, kid! “Man as Object: Reversing the Gaze,” an adults-only exhibition featuring 117 saucy works by women, runs Nov. 4-30 at SOMArts Cultural Center, 934 Brannan St., San Fran-cisco. Meet the artists (among them Monthly publisher Karen Klaber) at an opening reception Friday, Nov. 4, 6-9 p.m.—or emulate them at a Peepshow Drawing Circle featuring live nude male models on Sunday, Nov. 13, 12-3 p.m. For info: (415) 863-1414 or somarts.org. Dreams don’t just come true in the movies. This year, the Berkeley Film Foundation (BFF) has awarded $162,000—including $20,000 to Lisa Fruchtman for Sweet Dreams Besotted by Brits. and $12,000 to Academy Award–nominee Judith Erlich for The Mouse That Roared—to independent and documentary filmmak-ers. The foundation was created in 2009 by Wareham Development, the city of Berkeley, and the Saul Zaentz Company to support the Berkeley indie film community. Meet the winners (16 were selected out of 40) at the 2011 Annual Fundraiser and Novemberfest, Thursday, Nov. 10, 6-8 p.m., Zaentz Media Center, 2600 Tenth St., Berkeley. For info and tickets ($100): (510) 486-2066 or berkeleyfilmfoundation2011.eventbrite.com. Celebration of Craftswomen, the nation’s largest annual event celebrating the craft of, well, women, is slated from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Nov. 11, 12, and 13 at Fort Mason Center Festival Pavilion in San Francisco. For tickets ($9 and less) and info: (650) 615-6838 or celebrationofcraftswomen.org. Point Richmond Acoustic continues its second season Friday, Nov. 11, at 8 p.m. with singers Katie Dahl, a young singer-songwriter from Minnesota, and Point Richmond’s own Claudia Russell, accompanied by Russell’s husband/mandolinist, Bruce Kaplan. Con-certs are held in the First Methodist Church of Point Richmond, 2021 Martina Ave. For info and tickets ($15): folkunlimited.com. Get poked for free! The 3-year-old Oak-land Acupuncture Project launches a sec-ond branch at 3718 Grand Ave. with a celebratory open house on Sunday, Nov. 13. No-cost ‘puncture provided from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (preschedule online); refreshments and meet-and-greet from 2 to 5 p.m. For info: (510) 842-6350 or oaklandacupunctureproject.com. Still wondering where Aunt Sophie was born? Get some help with that family tree at the Jewish family history open house, Sunday, Nov. 13, 1-5 p.m., at the Oakland Regional Family History Center, 4766 Lincoln Ave. Hosted by the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society, the event provides experienced researchers to answer at least one family history question per attendee. Bring documents (copies only, no originals) and questions. Also, local author Ron Arons presents “Putting the Flesh on the Bones: Researching Why Our Ancestors Did What They Did.” For more info: sfbajgs.org. Create your own festive ceramic platter for the holidays with Berkeley designer Ceci Bowman on Thursday evening, Nov. 17. Part of the monthly Dish, Dine, Paint & Wine series at Brushstrokes Studio (745 Page St., Berkeley), the platter-making workshop and potluck runs 6-9 p.m. “I love the idea of making art we can use every day,” says Bowman, whose whimsical designs are found on ceram-ics, textiles, and greeting cards. “A butter dish and a pot holder should be as beautiful as the art hung in my living room.” For more on Bowman: cecibowmandesigns.com. To register for the workshop ($40, including materials): (510) 528-1360 or brushstrokestudio.com. Unitarians, already known for their progressive views on every-Pt. Richmond unplugged. Terminal talent. moms and dads, the five-member ensemble does Cajun, mariachi, Appalachian fiddle tunes, Italian folk music, Puccini arias, rock classics, and more. Also on the bill: Calaveras and the Harlan James Bluegrass Band. For tickets ($14.50 advance; $16.50 at the door) and info: (510) 644-2020 or freightandsalvage.org. thing from war to gay marriage, apparently also had an eye for architecture, especially early Berkeley Unitarians like the Maybecks and other Hillside Club founders. On Friday, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m., Daniella Thompson speaks on “The Berkeley Unitarians and Architectural Innovation” at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley (designed by A.C. Schweinfurth and completed in 1898), 1 Lawson Road, Kensington. Thompson will trace the history of the Unitarian community in Berkeley and the relationship between cul-ture and nature in its church buildings. Part of the Berkeley Archi-tectural Heritage Association fall lecture series, admission is $15. For info: (510) 841-2242 or berkeleyheritage.com. —Got your own idea for a Meet, Go, Read, or Taste, etc., for Be East Bay? Send us an email at editorial@themonthly.com. — 4 N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 1 EDITOR’S NOTE B lack Friday sounds bad and plays worse: a day when, fresh from giving props to the acquisitive Pilgrims, we slip on our shopping shoes (you know, the ones with steel toes, for kicking smaller, weaker bargain-hunters to the ground) and head out to hunt. For the past 19 years, though, Black Friday has also been cel-ebrated—or, rather, denigrated— as an international holiday of pro-test known as Buy Nothing Day. “’Tis the season to reclaim our year-end celebrations and make them our own again,” proclaims the website for Adbusters, the Vancouver-based anti-consumerism group that dreamed up the idea of the funds-free day—and, not coincidentally, lent a hand to the launch of Occupy Wall Street. Not only is it more righteous to stay out of stores the day after Thanksgiving, it’s also safer: three years ago, you may recall, a security guard at a Long Island Walmart was crushed to death by a Black Friday crowd surging through the doors. (A common human response: that’s the wages of mate-rialism. Walmart’s response: make Black Friday a 24-hour event.) But let’s not conflate well-earned protest against greed in high places with the current fad for pseudo-simplicity. From earnest treatises in glossy magazines like Real Simple and Oto the chatter at the coffee shop (chai latte, $3.75) or yoga stu-dio (annual membership, $1,200), the mantra of minimalism is ram-pant—a sleek, aesthetically pleas-ing brand of minimalism, anyway (not the bare light bulb variety). The irony is, shall we say, abundant. And what of the premise? Is a single stem really better than a bouquet? Does an aria trump a symphony? Is a Zen rock garden more meaningful than the Palace of Versailles? And if you whole-heartedly believe all these things to be true, then doesn’t it behoove you not only to downsize your shoe closet, but also to turn your back on that second slice of pie, the sky-scraper stack of bedside reading, the craving for a second or third child, the quivering tangle of im-ages and desires bobbling around in your cranium like one of those silver balls of intertwined fish at the aquarium (single adult ticket, $29.95)? For those of us fortunate enough to worry about overconsumption— our culture’s, our own—withhold-ing our purchasing power is a wor-thy experiment. But while we’re busy congratulating ourselves, let’s not forget about those who forego shopping every day—not as a mat-ter of principle, but of poverty. And while we’re “occupying” dozens of cities across the nation, let’s not for-get about also occupying—thought-fully, with integrity—our own hunter-gatherer skins. ○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○ ○ ○ ○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○○ WRITTEN BY THE EDITORS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. PHOTOS COURTESY RESPECTIVE COMPANIES/EVENTS/PEOPLE. BUTOH/NOGUCHI PHOTO BY NINA EGERT. WRITTEN BY THE EDITORS UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. PHOTOS COURTESY RESPECTIVE COMPANIES/EVENTS/PEOPLE. e

EDITOR’S NOTE


Black Friday sounds bad and plays worse: a day when, fresh from giving props to the acquisitive Pilgrims, we slip on our shopping shoes (you know, the ones with steel toes, for kicking smaller, weaker bargain-hunters to the ground) and head out to hunt.

For the past 19 years, though, Black Friday has also been celebrated— or, rather, denigrated—as an international holiday of protest known as Buy Nothing Day. “’Tis the season to reclaim our year-end celebrations and make them our own again,” proclaims the website for Adbusters, the Vancouver-based anti-consumerism group that dreamed up the idea of the funds-free day—and, not coincidentally, lent a hand to the launch of Occupy Wall Street.

Not only is it more righteous to stay out of stores the day after Thanksgiving, it’s also safer: three years ago, you may recall, a security guard at a Long Island Walmart was crushed to death by a Black Friday crowd surging through the doors. (A common human response: that’s the wages of materialism. Walmart’s response: make Black Friday a 24-hour event.)

But let’s not conflate well-earned protest against greed in high places with the current fad for pseudosimplicity. From earnest treatises in glossy magazines like Real Simple and O to the chatter at the coffee shop (chai latte, $3.75) or yoga studio (annual membership, $1,200), the mantra of minimalism is rampant— a sleek, aesthetically pleasing brand of minimalism, anyway (not the bare light bulb variety). The irony is, shall we say, abundant.

And what of the premise? Is a single stem really better than a bouquet? Does an aria trump a symphony? Is a Zen rock garden more meaningful than the Palace of Versailles? And if you wholeheartedly believe all these things to be true, then doesn’t it behoove you not only to downsize your shoe closet, but also to turn your back on that second slice of pie, the skyscraper stack of bedside reading, the craving for a second or third child, the quivering tangle of images and desires bobbling around in your cranium like one of those silver balls of intertwined fish at the aquarium (single adult ticket, $29.95)?

For those of us fortunate enough to worry about overconsumption—our culture’s, our own—withholding our purchasing power is a worthy experiment. But while we’re busy congratulating ourselves, let’s not forget about those who forego shopping every day—not as a matter of principle, but of poverty. And while we’re “occupying” dozens of cities across the nation, let’s not forget about also occupying—thoughtfully, with integrity—our own hunter-gatherer skins.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/EDITOR%E2%80%99S+NOTE/874009/86450/article.html.

BeEB Be East Bay


KUDOS
After a half-century of hard, often handson work, Save the Bay is ready to party. On Thursday, Nov. 3, the powerful grassroots organization hosts the gala Splash! 50 Years of Making Waves, at the Metreon (101 Fourth St., San Francisco), featuring fine regional foods and wines, live and silent auctions, entertainment by Lavay Smith and the Red Hot Skillet Lickers, and, okay, a $250 admission fee (that benefits one of the best environmental causes around). Founded in 1961 by East Bay residents Kay Kerr, Sylvia McLaughlin, and Esther Gulick, the volunteer-intensive group scored an initial coup by halting the city of Berkeley’s plan to expand by filling the Bay waters just offshore. Five decades later, Save the Bay continues to challenge bayfill and shoreline development, reduce runoff pollution, restore wetlands, and do its bit to promote gracious California living. For gala tickets and info: (510) 463-6850 or savesfbay.org.

READ
The September Queen, Gillian Bagwell’s second sexy novel set in olde England, is hot off the press (Berkley Publishing Group, to be precise) this month. The book centers around the true story of the passionate and adventurous Jane Lane, a 17th-century English woman who risked her life to rescue King Charles II from peril. Berkeley-born and -bred, author Bagwell is a former actress and lifelong Anglophile who studied drama in London and founded the Pasadena Shakespeare Company, which she headed for nine years. Bagwell hosts a release party for The September Queen on Tuesday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m., at Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant Ave. For info: (510) 647-8784 or gillianbagwell.com.

GO
Over at the Oakland Asian Cultural Center (388 Ninth St.), Yone Noguchi in California: A Japanese Poet Among Oakland’s Famous Writers runs through Jan. 31. The exhibit features not only Noguchi’s work, but also that of the writers who influenced him— among them Bay Area authors Joaquin Miller and John Muir. On Sunday, Nov. 6 (1-3 p.m.), the center offers “Bringing the Outside In,” a free presentation on Japanese flower-arranging and writing haiku, in keeping with Noguchi’s keen observations on nature. Same place, different time: a free, Noguchi-inspired collaborative dance and poetry performance, “Kneel to You Like a Sigh,” on Sunday, Nov. 13, at 2 p.m. For info: (510) 637-0455 or oacc.cc.

If you find yourself in Terminal 3 at San Francisco International Airport near Gate 76, check out the Benjamen Chinn: Paris 1950– 1951 photography show on display through the end of this month. Part of SFO Museum’s rotating exhibit program, Chinn’s black-andwhite photos portray daily Parisian life, including families, musicians, and workers. Born on Commercial Street in San Francisco’s Chinatown district in 1921, Chinn’s photography interest began when he was 10, when he learned to develop and print photographs in the family basement. For info: (650) 821-6700 or flysfo.com.

Homegrown, happy-go-lucky, and, in the words of band member Dan Ringer- Barwick, “completely unknown,” the rootsy, acoustic band Fools Creek plays Freight & Salvage (2020 Addison St., Berkeley) on Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 8 p.m. Composed entirely of working moms and dads, the five-member ensemble does Cajun, mariachi, Appalachian fiddle tunes, Italian folk music, Puccini arias, rock classics, and more. Also on the bill: Calaveras and the Harlan James Bluegrass Band. For tickets ($14.50 advance; $16.50 at the door) and info: (510) 644-2020 or freightandsalvage.org.

Work by more than 100 artists will be for sale Nov. 3-6 at 50 percent off at KALASSAL, A Colossal Art Sale/Fundraiser to benefit Kala Art Institute, a nonprofit arts organization that offers studio residencies, gallery exhibitions, and public educational programs. The free event kicks off Thursday, Nov. 3, 6-9 p.m, at the Kala Gallery, 2990 San Pablo Ave., Berkeley. Come swing to the music of 5 Cent Coffee, a postmodern jug band from Vallejo, and sample fare from the Guerrilla Grub food truck. The sale continues Nov. 4-5, 12-5:30 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 6, 12-4:30 p.m. For info: (510) 841-7000 or kala.org/kalassal.

Here’s looking at you, kid! “Man as Object: Reversing the Gaze,” an adults-only exhibition featuring 117 saucy works by women, runs Nov. 4-30 at SOMArts Cultural Center, 934 Brannan St., San Francisco. Meet the artists (among them Monthly publisher Karen Klaber) at an opening reception Friday, Nov. 4, 6-9 p.m.—or emulate them at a Peepshow Drawing Circle featuring live nude male models on Sunday, Nov. 13, 12-3 p.m. For info: (415) 863-1414 or somarts.org.

Dreams don’t just come true in the movies. This year, the Berkeley Film Foundation (BFF) has awarded $162,000—including $20,000 to Lisa Fruchtman for Sweet Dreams and $12,000 to Academy Award–nominee Judith Erlich for The Mouse That Roared—to independent and documentary filmmakers. The foundation was created in 2009 by Wareham Development, the city of Berkeley, and the Saul Zaentz Company to support the Berkeley indie film community. Meet the winners (16 were selected out of 40) at the 2011 Annual Fundraiser and Novemberfest, Thursday, Nov. 10, 6-8 p.m., Zaentz Media Center, 2600 Tenth St., Berkeley. For info and tickets ($100): (510) 486-2066 or berkeley film foundation 2011.eventbrite.com.

Celebration of Craftswomen, the nation’s largest annual event celebrating the craft of, well, women, is slated from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Nov. 11, 12, and 13 at Fort Mason Center Festival Pavilion in San Francisco. For tickets ($9 and less) and info: (650) 615-6838 or celebrationofcraftswomen.org.

Point Richmond Acoustic continues its second season Friday, Nov. 11, at 8 p.m. with singers Katie Dahl, a young singer-songwriter from Minnesota, and Point Richmond’s own Claudia Russell, accompanied by Russell’s husband/mandolinist, Bruce Kaplan. Concerts are held in the First Methodist Church of Point Richmond, 2021 Martina Ave. For info and tickets ($15): folkunlimited.com.

Get poked for free! The 3-year-old Oakland Acupuncture Project launches a second branch at 3718 Grand Ave. with a celebratory open house on Sunday, Nov. 13. No-cost ‘puncture provided from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (preschedule online); refreshments and meet-and-greet from 2 to 5 p.m. For info: (510) 842-6350 or oaklandacupunctureproject.com.

Still wondering where Aunt Sophie was born? Get some help with that family tree at the Jewish family history open house, Sunday, Nov. 13, 1-5 p.m., at the Oakland Regional Family History Center, 4766 Lincoln Ave. Hosted by the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society, the event provides experienced researchers to answer at least one family history question per attendee. Bring documents (copies only, no originals) and questions. Also, local author Ron Arons presents “Putting the Flesh on the Bones: Researching Why Our Ancestors Did What They Did.” For more info: sfbajgs.org.

Create your own festive ceramic platter for the holidays with Berkeley designer Ceci Bowman on Thursday evening, Nov. 17. Part of the monthly Dish, Dine, Paint & Wine series at Brushstrokes Studio (745 Page St., Berkeley), the platter-making workshop and potluck runs 6-9 p.m. “I love the idea of making art we can use every day,” says Bowman, whose whimsical designs are found on ceramics, textiles, and greeting cards. “A butter dish and a pot holder should be as beautiful as the art hung in my living room.” For more on Bowman: cecibowmandesigns.com. To register for the workshop ($40, including materials): (510) 528-1360 or brushstrokestudio.com.

Unitarians, already known for their progressive views on everything from war to gay marriage, apparently also had an eye for architecture, especially early Berkeley Unitarians like the Maybecks and other Hillside Club founders. On Friday, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m., Daniella Thompson speaks on “The Berkeley Unitarians and Architectural Innovation” at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley (designed by A.C. Schweinfurth and completed in 1898), 1 Lawson Road, Kensington. Thompson will trace the history of the Unitarian community in Berkeley and the relationship between culture and nature in its church buildings. Part of the Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association fall lecture series, admission is $15. For info: (510) 841-2242 or berkeleyheritage.com.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/BeEB+Be+East+Bay/874011/86450/article.html.

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