Palmetto Parent 2010 December Issue : Page 7

WHAT’S NEWS Pediatricians encouraged to screen moms for postpartum depression Pediatricians are encouraged to screen mothers for postpartum depression, to use community resources for the treatment and referral of depressed mothers and to provide support for the mother-child relationship, according to a report published by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The AAP noted that postpartum depression can lead to increased medical costs, inappropriate medical care, discontinuation of breastfeed-ing and child abuse and neglect. Estimated rates of depression among pregnant and postpartum women can range between 5 percent and 25 percent. A family history of depression, alcohol abuse and a per-sonal history of depression increase the risk of prenatal depression. A prenatal visit with the pediatri-cian is an excellent opportunity to establish a relationship with the parents, assess for risk of depression and support and initiate preventive strategies, according to the report. Autistic kids may be at increased risk for vision loss Autistic children with severely limited diets may be at risk for vision loss due to vitamin B12 deficiency, accord-ing to a study by The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The study’s authors said doctors should consider this deficiency when evaluating and treating children with autism and vision loss. Because feeding disorders are sometimes associated with autism, the study suggests chil-dren who refuse meat and dairy products are at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. The vision loss is said to be treatable and possibly partially reversible. Want a salad with that? According to a Cornell University study, sales of fruit in school lunchrooms increased by 100 percent when the fruit was moved to a colorful bowl. And when salad bars were moved in front of cash regis-ters, sales tripled. Researchers point to other findings that increased students’ purchase of healthy foods: creating an express line for students who are not buying desserts and chips; placing chocolate milk behind plain milk; placing ice cream in a freezer with a closed, opaque top; and having cafeteria workers ask students if they want a salad. Obese children’s blood vessels show signs of heart disease The blood vessels of obese children have signs of heart disease typi-cally associ-ated with much older adults, ac-cording to a researcher with British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital. The children studied had aortic stiffness, as if the aging process had been ac-celerated in the aorta, the largest artery in the human Cord Plus preserves placental stem cells Americord Registry has an-nounced “a breakthrough” in its efforts to preserve placental stem cells. The process, called Cord Plus, preserves up to 10 times more stem cells than are found in a unit of umbilical cord blood, which contains only enough stem cells to treat a patient weighing December 2010 less than 65 pounds. The new technique is said to increase the chance that preserved placental stem cells can be used to treat adults. The National Marrow Donor Program projects that there will be 10,000 cord blood transplants per year by 2015, up from 2,000 in 2006. body. The aorta was affected even in obese children with cholesterol levels and blood pressure that was not much different than children of a healthy weight. Compiled by Chris Worthy, contributing writer. E-mail chris@worthyplace.com. Palmetto Parent 7 www.palmettoparent.com

What's News

<b>Pediatricians encouraged to screen moms for postpartum depression</b><br /> Pediatricians are encouraged to screen mothers for postpartum depression, to use community resources for the treatment and referral of depressed mothers and to provide support for the mother-child relationship, according to a report published by the American Academy of Pediatrics.<br /> <br /> The AAP noted that postpartum depression can lead to increased medical costs, inappropriate medical care, discontinuation of breastfeeding and child abuse and neglect. <br /> <br /> Estimated rates of depression among pregnant and postpartum women can range between 5 percent and 25 percent. A family history of depression, alcohol abuse and a personal history of depression increase the risk of prenatal depression. A prenatal visit with the pediatrician is an excellent opportunity to establish a relationship with the parents, assess for risk of depression and support and initiate preventive strategies, according to the report.<br /> <br /> <br /> <b>Want a salad with that?</b><br /> According to a Cornell University study, sales of fruit in school lunchrooms increased by 100 percent when the fruit was moved to a colorful bowl. <br /> <br /> And when salad bars were moved in front of cash registers, sales tripled. Researchers point to other findings that increased students’ purchase of healthy foods: creating an express line for students who are not buying desserts and chips; placing chocolate milk behind plain milk; placing ice cream in a freezer with a closed, opaque top; and having cafeteria workers ask students if they want a salad.<br /> <br /> <br /> <b>Cord Plus preserves placental stem cells</b><br /> Americord Registry has announced “a breakthrough” in its efforts to preserve placental stem cells. The process, called Cord Plus, preserves up to 10 times more stem cells than are found in a unit of umbilical cord blood, which contains only enough stem cells to treat a patient weighing less than 65 pounds. The new technique is said to increase the chance that preserved placental stem cells can be used to treat adults. The National Marrow Donor Program projects that there will be 10,000 cord blood transplants per year by 2015, up from 2,000 in 2006. <br /> <br /> <br /> <b>Autistic kids may be at increased risk for vision loss</b><br /> Autistic children with severely limited diets may be at risk for vision loss due to vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a study by The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The study’s authors said doctors should consider this deficiency when evaluating and treating children with autism and vision loss. Because feeding disorders are sometimes associated with autism, the study suggests children who refuse meat and dairy products are at risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. The vision loss is said to be treatable and possibly partially reversible.<br /> <br /> <br /> <b>Obese children’s blood vessels show signs of heart disease</b><br /> The blood vessels of obese children have signs of heart disease typically associated with much older adults, according to a researcher with British Columbia’s Children’s Hospital.<br /> <br /> The children studied had aortic stiffness, as if the aging process had been accelerated in the aorta, the largest artery in the human body. The aorta was affected even in obese children with cholesterol levels and blood pressure that was not much different than children of a healthy weight.

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