Palmetto Parent 2010 July issue : Page 19

Yes,we hear you! The (almost) last person in America finally gets connected with a cell phone I t only took me 10 years to do it, but I guess I am now officially in the 21st century — at least from a technology standpoint. I have been here for a Home Front Robert L. Bradley while on some fronts, such as cameras and computers. But from one standpoint I have really been behind the curve, according to most people. I was probably one of the last people in America to get one, but I finally have a cell phone. It’s not that I didn’t necessarily have the need for one. I just didn’t want one. I have a phone at home I use while I’m there. I think it’s ridiculous to drive and talk on the phone, it’s rude to talk on the phone when I’m eating lunch with someone, and there are times I want to get away from ev- erything. There was something about carry- ing a device with me that enabled people to always reach me that just wasn’t appealing. When I’m at the lake or on the softball field, that’s my getaway time. I really don’t want to be contacted. Of course, during those times, who’s to say I have to answer the phone or even have it with me? My wife,Lori, and I got our first cell phone 11 years ago when we started to build our house. We felt we’d have one in case of an emergency or if we needed to get in touch with a contractor. The plan we had was simple: a set amount per month and then so much per minute. We graduated to a few new plans, but it was always a shared phone that Lori kept with her most of the time. I rarely made a call and if anyone ever left me a message, I didn’t have a clue how to retrieve it. Our daughters, Sam and Robin, badgered me constantly about getting a phone. Every time I would use “our”phone, they would point out that I did need one because I was using it at that moment. But I stuck to my guns.I went by the July 2010 www.palmettoparent.com Palmetto Parent 19 philosophy that I had gone this long without a cell and I didn’t need one now. But things change — such as my job — and life’s chang- es finally dictated that I should look seriously at getting a phone. The girls finally pushed me hard enough and I gave in. They got me an iPhone for my birthday, complete with a text and data plan. The phone is more-or-less idiot proof. There are pictures on the screen, and all I have to do is touch one of the pictures to do what I want. I sure hope being able to text will come easily, but I do sometimes wish the phone had bigger buttons for my fingers. Sam can write and send a novel to some- one in the length of time it takes me to type in something simple like “When will you be home?” The wrong letters keep popping up, so I am constantly erasing and trying again. As long as I don’t have to reply to a text message, texting is easy. Robin was real proud of the fact that I have a cell phone and announced it to several teammates at a softball game. I immediately started getting text messages from unknown numbers.Some of the players thought it was cute to send me a text and watch me try to figure out whom it was from. “Emily, I got a new cell phone, too.Do you want my num- ber?”Lori said to one of the players. “No, you’re not as much fun to aggravate as he is,” the player replied And with that, Emily proceeded to send me another message. I told her she was using up all my text messages, but Robin quickly responded that I have an unlimited plan. Thanks, Robin. Now I’ll be getting text messages from some of the players all the time just because they like to aggravate me. What a way to be welcomed to the 21st century.] Robert L. Bradley is the page designer for this magazine. Address comments or questions to bradleymedia@me.com. 1406

Home Front - Yes, we hear you!

Robert L. Bradley

<font size=3>The (almost) last person in America finally gets a cell phone</font size=3><br /> <br /> <br /> It only took me 10 years to do it, but I guess I am now officially in the 21st century — at least from a technology standpoint.<br /> <br /> I have been here for a while on some fronts, such as cameras and computers. But from one standpoint I have really been behind the curve, according to most people. I was probably one of the last people in America to get one, but I finally have a cell phone.<br /> <br /> It’s not that I didn’t necessarily have the need for one. <br /> <br /> I just didn’t want one.<br /> <br /> I have a phone at home I use while I’m there. I think it’s ridiculous to drive and talk on the phone, it’s rude to talk on the phone when I’m eating lunch with someone, and there are times I want to get away from everything. There was something about carrying a device with me that enabled people to always reach me that just wasn’t appealing.<br /> <br /> When I’m at the lake or on the softball field, that’s my getaway time. I really don’t want to be contacted. Of course, during those times, who’s to say I have to answer the phone or even have it with me?<br /> <br /> My wife, Lori, and I got our first cell phone 11 years ago when we started to build our house. We felt we’d have one in case of an emergency or if we needed to get in touch with a contractor. The plan we had was simple: a set amount per month and then so much per minute. We graduated to a few new plans, but it was always a shared phone that Lori kept with her most of the time. I rarely made a call and if anyone ever left me a message, I didn’t have a clue how to retrieve it.<br /> <br /> Our daughters, Sam and Robin, badgered me constantly about getting a phone. Every time I would use “our” phone, they would point out that I did need one because I was using it at that moment.<br /> <br /> But I stuck to my guns. I went by the philosophy that I had gone this long without a cell and I didn’t need one now. But things change — such as my job — and life’s changes finally dictated that I should look seriously at getting a phone.<br /> <br /> The girls finally pushed me hard enough and I gave in. They got me an iPhone for my birthday, complete with a text and data plan. The phone is more-or-less idiot proof. There are pictures on the screen, and all I have to do is touch one of the pictures to do what I want. I sure hope being able to text will come easily, but I do sometimes wish the phone had bigger buttons for my fingers.<br /> <br /> Sam can write and send a novel to someone in the length of time it takes me to type in something simple like “When will you be home?” The wrong letters keep popping up, so I am constantly erasing and trying again. As long as I don’t have to reply to a text message, texting is easy.<br /> <br /> Robin was real proud of the fact that I have a cell phone and announced it to several teammates at a softball game. I immediately started getting text messages from unknown numbers. Some of the players thought it was cute to send me a text and watch me try to figure out whom it was from.<br /> <br /> “Emily, I got a new cell phone, too. Do you want my number?” Lori said to one of the players.<br /> <br /> “No, you’re not as much fun to aggravate as he is,” the player replied<br /> <br /> And with that, Emily proceeded to send me another message.<br /> <br /> I told her she was using up all my text messages, but Robin quickly responded that I have an unlimited plan.<br /> <br /> Thanks, Robin. <br /> <br /> Now I’ll be getting text messages from some of the players all the time just because they like to aggravate me.<br /> <br /> What a way to be welcomed to the 21st century.

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