The Bullsheet January 2017 Bullsheet : Page 1

Kansas City Barbeque Society – America’s Barbeque Experts!® JANUARY 2017 Postmaster: Dated Material. Please deliver by January 10, 2017 The Monthly Publication of the Kansas City Barbeque Society The Good, The Bad and The Ugly: Comment Cards Candy Weaver, BBQr’s Delight Love ‘em or hate ‘em, getting comment cards is a mixed gift for any BBQ cook! Let’s face it, a large part of cooking is the Head Cook’s EGO. A positive comment card can really stroke that ego! Often a comment card can help the cook. With all the check off info on the comment cards, a judge can quickly identify for the cook a specific issue with the entry. Sometimes a negative comment card just confirms what the cook already knew. Generally, a cook knows when their entry is not their finest. Sometimes comment cards will give the cook a good laugh. I got one in Dillard this year that gave me a giggle. After struggling with a brand new cooker to get chicken done (and not raw!), the judge told me that the chicken was dry and overdone. I worked hard to get it that way – Done! In 2010, around a campfire on a Friday night in Vermillion, SD, a bunch of cooks were visiting and the subject of comment cards came up. Rod Gray, Pellet Envy, shared a comment card that he received about his pork entry. Judge told him his presentation was too com-mon or words to that effect. Yes, I imagine many cooks that took his cooking classes were using that very same presentation. Pellet Envy won 2009 Team of the Year and was 9th in Pork. At Ribs, Rods & Rock’n Roll the next day, Rod took 7th in pork, 1st in ribs and 3rd overall. I wonder if he changed in pork presentation? Speaking of pork comment cards, I got one in Hammond’s 2015 Smoke Blues & BBQ that changed my pork box. I was on a pork ego trip that year. Putting pork in the box 5-6 ways, I wanted to overwhelm the judges with my pork prowess! Many times it did just that, got several top 10 pork calls with this box. The comment card reminded me that “Sometime less is best!” This year, I have had 2 firsts in pork, both with simple pork boxes. Now that we’ve started a new contest year, I’m doing lots of BBQ cooking evaluation. Comment cards are very important in that process, even the oddball comment cards. I’ve mapped out my contest results, charting how the scoring breakdown is for appearance, taste and tenderness. I’m planning practice based on that breakdown and re-examining comment cards for specific tips from judges. I fully expect it will help me hone the crafting of BBQ for 2017. Thank YOU judges for taking the time to complete comment cards! Inside RETAIL LIST Books, Seasonings & More ASK KCBS 14 27 New Members Master CBJ’s Lifetime Members 100+ Contests Kids Que 28-29 30 32 6 31 CLASS SCHEDULES Cooking Classes Judging Classes Table Captain Classes UPCOMING EVENTS 2016-2017 Events Volume 49, Issue 1 26 26-27 29 22-25 2519 Madison Ave. KCMO 64108 Phone: 800.963.5227 www.kcbs.us

The Good, The Bad And The Ugly: Comment Cards

Candy Weaver

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, getting comment cards is a mixed gift for any BBQ cook! Let’s face it, a large part of cooking is the Head Cook’s EGO. A positive comment card can really stroke that ego! Often a comment card can help the cook. With all the check off info on the comment cards, a judge can quickly identify for the cook a specific issue with the entry. Sometimes a negative comment card just confirms what the cook already knew. Generally, a cook knows when their entry is not their finest.

Sometimes comment cards will give the cook a good laugh. I got one in Dillard this year that gave me a giggle. After struggling with a brand new cooker to get chicken done (and not raw!), the judge told me that the chicken was dry and overdone. I worked hard to get it that way – Done!

In 2010, around a campfire on a Friday night in Vermillion, SD, a bunch of cooks were visiting and the subject of comment cards came up. Rod Gray, Pellet Envy, shared a comment card that he received about his pork entry. Judge told him his presentation was too common or words to that effect. Yes, I imagine many cooks that took his cooking classes were using that very same presentation. Pellet Envy won 2009 Team of the Year and was 9th in Pork. At Ribs, Rods & Rock’n Roll the next day, Rod took 7th in pork, 1st in ribs and 3rd overall. I wonder if he changed in pork presentation?

Speaking of pork comment cards, I got one in Hammond’s 2015 Smoke Blues & BBQ that changed my pork box. I was on a pork ego trip that year. Putting pork in the box 5-6 ways, I wanted to overwhelm the judges with my pork prowess! Many times it did just that, got several top 10 pork calls with this box. The comment card reminded me that “Sometime less is best!” This year, I have had 2 firsts in pork, both with simple pork boxes.

Now that we’ve started a new contest year, I’m doing lots of BBQ cooking evaluation. Comment cards are very important in that process, even the oddball comment cards. I’ve mapped out my contest results, charting how the scoring breakdown is for appearance, taste and tenderness. I’m planning practice based on that breakdown and reexamining comment cards for specific tips from judges. I fully expect it will help me hone the crafting of BBQ for 2017.

Thank YOU judges for taking the time to complete comment cards!

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/The+Good%2C+The+Bad+And+The+Ugly%3A+Comment+Cards/2672206/370517/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here