The Monthly May 2014 : Page 3

In thIs Issue the oLdest IndePendentLy oWned eAst BAy PuBLIcAtIon volume 44, Number 8 • May 2014 MarGarETTa K. MiTCHELL the oBseRveR Slicing and Dicing PuBLIsheR & foundeR KAREN KLABER edItoR t Judith M. GALLMAN ARt dIRectoR ANdREAs JoNEs WeB desIgneR EvA RuLANd PRoofReAdeR dAwN AdAMs contRIButIng WRIteRs d e witt ChENG, MAtthEw CRAGGs, ANN LEsLiE dAvis, susAN E. dAvis, MARy EisENhARt, R.E. FARo, RitA FELCiANo, MiChAEL Fox, ANdREw GiLBERt, sAM huRwitt, PAuL KiLduFF, MiKE RosEN-MoLiNA, MARthA Ross, ANNELi RuFus, RENEE MACALiNo RutLEdGE, ChRistiNE sChoEFER, dAvid sChwoEGLER, RAChEL tRAChtEN, KERi hAyEs tRoutMAN, LAuRiE wAGNER, sARAh wELd, KAtE MAddEN yEE contRIButIng ARtIsts On the move: Graham Lustig of the Oakland Ballet Company springs across the studio with his dancers watching. reportage | Essays, Columns, and Observations 5 firsT pErsON | Russ ANdo, PhyLLis ChRistoPhER, LoRi EANEs, LENNy GoNzALEz, GARy hANdMAN, JoRy JohN, PAuL KiLduFF, KRistAN LAwsoN GAiL MAChLis, PAt MAzzERA, AENGus McGiFFiN, ALAiN McLAuGhLiN, MARGAREttA K. MitChELL, AvERy MoNsEN, BARBARA PoLLoK, EvA RuLANd, susAN sANFoRd, ANdy siNGER, JAMiE soJA, BiLL & BoB thoMAs, dAvid wiLsoN, PhiL wittE, MARK ziEMANN Mothering is a tough job, and in this essay by a Berkeley memoirist, pregnancy and birth change the life of a teenage mother—for the better. By Christine Schoefer The Good Mother Born to Dance 6 LETTErs 7 MY GENEraTiON | Graham Lustig, the artistic director of the Oakland Ballet Company, positions the troupe as more than a dance venue. Meet up with him just in time for Oakland-esque and the annual OBC gala. By Mike Rosen-Molina Culture | arts, Events, and Diversions 9 MUsiC | More than one Bay area female vocalist got her start singing in church and played pivotal roles as backup singers for major acts. four often-overlooked Bay area soul queens talk about their glory days. By Andrew Gilbert Backup Singers Who Mattered The Fifth String Telegraph Media PuBLIsheR 11 CriTiC’s CHOiCE | stEPhEN BuEL AdveRtIsIng sALes Plus art: samantha fields’ painterly photos. film: Disco fever at the paramount. Dance: Diablo Ballet season-Ender. music: Billy Buss plays a Twofer. ELAiNE LEstE LoRi LiENEKE NAtALiE MitChELL KAi wiLLiAMs AdveRtIsIng sALes & geneRAL Info 12 BE EasT BaY: read, Listen, Dance, Go, Honor. By Renee Macalino Rutledge 13 BOUTiqUE Bazaar: Distinctive small shops, Etc. repaSt | reviews, Notes, and Trends 510-238-9101 sALEs@thEMoNthLy.CoM 15 DiNiNG rEviEw | The Monthly shuffles into El Cerrito for Elevation 66 Brewing Company. picturesque neighborhood, shiny vats of beers, reclaimed material as décor, intriguing artisanal fare. who could ask for anything more?. By Anneli Rufus Elevation 66 15 fOOD fOr THOUGHT: Caterers, food & wine purveyors, Etc. 16 DiNiNG GUiDE: Menu of Local restaurants 16 NOsH BOx: Tis the season for Berries, shortcake, and Cream. By David Schwoegler marketplaCe & ClaSSifieDS 17 HOME & GarDEN 20 prOfEssiONaL, pErsONaL, & CrEaTivE sErviCEs baCk page 22 THE KiLDUff fiLE | the guARAnteed mInImum PRess Run of the monthLy Is: 62,000 monthLy Tim Draper Call for SubmiSSionS: images for our annual student cover art contest, p. 14. the monthly is delivered free of charge to homes in select residential areas of Alameda, Albany, Berkeley, El Cerrito, Kensington, Oakland, Orinda, and Piedmont. Fifteen percent of the total circulation is placed at drop points or mailed throughout the Bay Area. The Monthly is published once a month, since 1970. Subscriptions are available for $36 per year. The editorial and business offices are located at 1305 Franklin Street, Suite 501, Oakland, CA 94612. Any views expressed in any advertisement, signed letter, article, or photograph are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the position of The Monthly or its parent company. The East Bay Monthly © 2014 Telegraph Media. All rights reserved. No portion of The Monthly may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Frank Zappa: You can’t be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline. It helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer. The Monthly is not responsible for unsolicited material. How to reach The Monthly: 1305 franklin street, suite 501, Oakland, Ca 94612 Phone 510.238.9101 • Fax 510.238.9163 themonthly.com EMaiL: Letters: letters @ themonthly.com Editorial Department: editorial @ themonthly.com sales Department: sales @ themonthly.com art Department: artdirector @ themonthly.com send print-ready ads to: ads @ themonthly.com silicon valley vC pushes to divide California into six states. By Paul Kilduff 22 KarTOON KOrNEr June Issue Advertising Deadlines: space reservation & production Deadline ....... wednesday, May 7 Camera ready Deadline ...................................... wednesday, May 14 publication Date ..................................................... wednesday, May 28 next montH: settle in for good reading, because June marks our literary issue and features the winners of our summer essay contest. Then learn how to be healthy without being a health fanatic, get to know a driving force of the african-american shakespeare Company, and try your hand at making soothing Moroccan mint tea. COvEr | Ellen Heck Ceclia as Frida (woodcut etching). artist Ellen Heck created this print as part of Forty Fridas, a series of forty woodcut etchings depicting women and girls dressed up as painter/icon frida Kahlo. This project, while in some respects a very intimate collection of personal portraits, touches more broadly on themes of identity—the multiple, individuality, and variation. Heck’s work is represented by Kala art institute, 2990 san pablo ave., in Berkeley. for more info, or to make an appointment, contact andrea voinot at 510-841-7000, ext. 206, or andrea@Kala.org. view Heck’s new work at EllenHeck.com. he observer’s spouse is a curious, questioning kind of guy who can be a bit impulsive at times. he’s also saintly in some respects, particularly where grocery shopping is concerned, though the observer, for the record, does buy her weight in carrots, apples, and celery. But the spouse was shopping at a safeway recently when he encountered a motley group of shoppers gathered around a dis-play stand in the produce section. he watched a dapper and prema-turely gray-haired gentleman, a master salesman with perky ban-ter, wowing the crowd: he diced, he sliced, and he shredded with the showmanship of a magician, using a Pro smart slicer (“sim-ple, sensible, and Easy to use,” according to the box) instead of a top hat and wand. he then held up the device he was hawking, a kitchen mandoline, for everyone to marvel at. twist here for thick slices; turn again for thin; once more for thick julienne; and again for thin julienne. Cleaning? A cinch: Just rinse with water. his display of perfectly cut thick tomato slices, wafer-thin cucumbers, and julienned car-rots was very impressive. so was his ability to chop an onion with-out shedding a tear and to trans-form a potato in seconds, presto, into slim strips for fries. And he rather amazingly used practi-cally every ounce of the head of purple cabbage he was grating. Look how little waste! see how easy to use! shorten your prep time! And it’s safe! his pitch urged shoppers to buy now and cautioned that supplies were dwindling, so they better act fast, or they’d wind up spending a lot more, plus shipping and handling, if they went elsewhere. the observer’s spouse wasn’t buying. But then the hard sell came: Act now, the deft culinary illusionist urged, and he’d throw in something extra, something that every chef could use, a stainless-steel peeler. he then demonstrated, making quick work of a piece of fruit. No, thought the observer’s spouse, i don’t need it. But, wait, there’s more if you buy now! the slicing-dicing-shredding wizard had another enticement—the Euro scissors! An essential tool for any home. Cuts anything. vinyl grips. stainless-steel blades. Bottle/ jar opener. one serrated edge. will stay sharp for a lifetime of normal use sold, thanks to kitchen shears! And who could resist? the spouse was caught up in the mo-ment and bought the gadgets, apparently like some 300 or so other folks in the end. times in actual use in the observer’s kitchen since then? At least once. But it’s good to know there’s something magical in the cabinet. archival museum-quality reproductions of monthly covers available for purchase. View selection at themonthly.com. THE MonTHly onlInE : The entire East Bay Monthly magazine is available online at our website, with every story and ad also available in a digital edition. visit us at themonthly.com. Do you have an item for The Observer? The Observer is a forum for writers, including readers, to share narrative observations with some East Bay relevance. Send yours to editor@themonthly.com. T H E M O N T H L Y . C O M 3

The Observer

Slicing and Dicing

The observer’s spouse is a curious, questioning kind of guy who can be a bit impulsive at times. he’s also saintly in some respects, particularly where grocery shopping is concerned, though the observer, for the record, does buy her weight in carrots, apples, and celery.

But the spouse was shopping at a safeway recently when he encountered a motley group of shoppers gathered around a display stand in the produce section. he watched a dapper and prematurely gray-haired gentleman, a master salesman with perky banter, wowing the crowd: he diced, he sliced, and he shredded with the showmanship of a magician, using a Pro smart slicer (“simple, sensible, and Easy to use,” according to the box) instead of a top hat and wand. he then held up the device he was hawking, a kitchen mandoline, for everyone to marvel at.

Twist here for thick slices; turn again for thin; once more for thick julienne; and again for thin julienne. Cleaning? A cinch: Just rinse with water.

His display of perfectly cut thick tomato slices, wafer-thin cucumbers, and julienned carrots was very impressive. so was his ability to chop an onion without shedding a tear and to transform a potato in seconds, presto, into slim strips for fries. And he rather amazingly used practically every ounce of the head of purple cabbage he was grating.

Look how little waste! see how easy to use! shorten your prep time! And it’s safe!

His pitch urged shoppers to buy now and cautioned that supplies were dwindling, so they better act fast, or they’d wind up spending a lot more, plus shipping and handling, if they went elsewhere.

The observer’s spouse wasn’t buying. But then the hard sell came: Act now, the deft culinary illusionist urged, and he’d throw in something extra, something that every chef could use, a stainless-steel peeler. he then demonstrated, making quick work of a piece of fruit.

No, thought the observer’s spouse, i don’t need it.

But, wait, there’s more if you buy now! the slicing-dicing-shredding wizard had another enticement—the Euro scissors! An essential tool for any home. Cuts anything. vinyl grips. stainless-steel blades. Bottle/ jar opener. one serrated edge. will stay sharp for a lifetime of normal use

Sold, thanks to kitchen shears! And who could resist? the spouse was caught up in the moment and bought the gadgets, apparently like some 300 or so other folks in the end. times in actual use in the observer’s kitchen since then? At least once. But it’s good to know there’s something magical in the cabinet.

Do you have an item for The Observer? The Observer is a forum for writers, including readers, to share narrative observations with some East Bay relevance. Send yours to editor@themonthly.com.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/The+Observer/1697877/207132/article.html.

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